How to Report a Missing Person in Arizona

By Roger Thorne J.D.
One simple phone call to the local law enforcement agency is all it takes in many cases to file a missing person report.

Peter Starman/Photodisc/Getty Images

Thousands of missing persons reports are filed every year in the state of Arizona, according to the Phoenix Police Department. You can talk to law enforcement at any time if you believe a person is missing. There are no waiting limits to file the report or any requirements that you must be married or related to the missing person.

Contact your local police of sheriff's department. If you believe there is an emergency or someone is in danger, you can call 911. If not, call your local law enforcement agency and inform them you want to file a missing person report. If the person was last seen in a jurisdiction other than that in which you live, contact that area's law enforcement agency or ask your local law enforcement agency to refer you.

Provide details to the police. Filing a missing person report allows the police to begin an investigation. You can help this investigation by providing as many details and facts as you remember. If you have a recent photo of the missing person, this will help as well.

File an affidavit. One you file a missing person report with law enforcement, you may have to subsequently file an affidavit confirming the person is missing. For example, the city of Phoenix requires you to file a Missing Person Adult Waiver form. This form is essentially an affidavit that details your relationship to the missing person and states that you accept any civil liability for invasions of privacy that may take place during the course of the investigation. Ask the law enforcement agent for a copy of this form or provide information on where you can get one.

Contact a national missing person registry. National registries, such as the National Missing Persons System and the National Center for Missing and Exploited Children, maintain a database of missing persons for the entire country. Ask the law enforcement agency to add your case to this registry, or contact these registries yourself and add your information.

About the Author

Roger Thorne is an attorney who began freelance writing in 2003. He has written for publications ranging from "MotorHome" magazine to "Cruising World." Thorne specializes in writing for law firms, Web sites, and professionals. He has a Juris Doctor from the University of Kansas.

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