Laws Against Fake IDs in Kansas

By Jeremy Ruch
Kansas imposes strict penalties on people using or aiding others in the use of fake identification.

Kansas state contour with Capital City against blurred USA flag image by Stasys Eidiejus from Fotolia.com

Kansas imposes strict penalties on those founds guilty of carrying or using fake forms of identifications. State law also prohibits individuals from lending out or allowing others to use their driver’s licenses or identification. Although the regulations are almost identical, Kansas has separate laws dealing with fake or reproduced driver’s licenses (State law 8-260) and fake or reproduced forms of other identification (State law 8-1327).

Using Fraudulent Identification

Kansas law stipulates that it is illegal to use or even have in your possession a “fictitious or fraudulently altered” driver’s license or other form of identification. State law also prohibits you from using someone else’s id as your own. In addition, it is illegal to use a suspended or revoked form of identification--these must be surrendered to the appropriate authorities upon request. Finally, using fraudulent information on your application for a driver’s license is a felony.

Allowing Others to Use Identification

It is illegal to lend out or allow others to use your driver’s license or state identification. It is also a crime to knowingly allow others to use your ID in order to purchase alcohol, or use your ID to help someone else obtain their own illegally.

Punishment

The most serious crime pertaining to fake identification is using fake information on an official application--this is a felony. Other crimes are typically Class A or B misdemeanors, and are usually punishable by fines. According to the Kansas Traffic Safety Resource Office, disobeying laws covering fake identification can result in up to a $2,500 fine and/or a year in prison.

About the Author

Based in New York City, Jeremy Ruch has been a writer since 2010. He has been published in the university newspaper, "The Chronicle," and currently writes how-to articles, specializing in subjects pertaining to politics and law. He was an editorial page editor for his high school paper. He attends Duke University and is pursuing a Bachelor of Arts.

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