How to Get a Kansas ID Card

By Tara Kay Deville
Kansas does not allow online applications for a state ID card.

id form image by Alexey Klementiev from Fotolia.com

In the United States, a driver’s license is one of the most common forms of identification. However, if you live in Kansas and do not have a driver’s license, driving permit or another type of valid ID, you can get a non-driver identification card. These identification cards provide proof of age, identity and residence, much like a driver’s license but without driving privileges. It expires six years after issuance, on your birthday.

Visit ksrevenue.org and enter “dmv proof” into the search box. Click the “Kansas Department of Revenue -- Proof of Identity” link. You will find a complete list of acceptable documents to prove your identity, Kansas residency, primary address and proof of lawful presence if you are not a U.S. citizen or U.S.-born.

Decide which documents to use. If you are a U.S. citizen, your choices include but are not limited to a certified birth certificate, U.S. passport and U.S. military ID. If you are not a U.S. citizen or U.S.-born, a valid foreign passport or a photo Employment Authorization (issued by the U.S. Dept. of Justice) are among your choices.

Collect the necessary documents. A Social Security number is required, or you must provide proof of lawful presence. All documents must be the originals or certified copies.

Locate and go to the nearest Division of Vehicles office. You must personally take your documents into the office and complete the application form.

Pay the application fee. As of January 2011, the card fee is $10 if you are 65 or disabled; for everyone else it is $14. The $4 photo fee is extra. Pay by cash or check. Some locations accept credit or debit cards.

About the Author

Tara Kay Deville has worked as a writer since 2010. She brings expertise in writing about mental health issues and alternative medicine, with a special interest in vitamin and herbal supplements. Deville has a Master of Arts in counseling from Heidelberg College (now Heidelberg University, effective January 2009).

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