How to Get a CCW in Ohio

By Sameca Pandova
Ohio allows concealed weapon carry permits for qualified applicants.

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Ohio approved a concealed carry law (CCW) in 2004. The law allows individuals to carry handguns in a concealed manner, but places many restrictions and limitations on the right in the name of public safety. The process for obtaining a CCW is fairly involved, requiring training, fingerprinting, a background criminal check and license application. In addition, only a limited number of applications can be processed daily in some counties, thus a prospective CCW applicant will need to schedule a processing appointment.

Ensure you meet the requirements for a CCW license. Under Ohio law, you must be at least 21 years of age, be an Ohio resident for at least 45 years and be a resident of the county of application for a minimum of 30 days. You must not be a fugitive from justice and must have a clean criminal background.

Complete the required 12-hour course to obtain a Certificate of Competency. Your certificate must be no more than 3 years old to qualify for a CCW license. Ohio allows a retired police officer or honorably discharged veteran to waive the course requirement (military veterans must have been discharged within the previous 6 years).

Complete the CCW permit application from your local county sheriff's office, or download the application from the Ohio Attorney General website. Obtain a set of passport color photos to attach to your application.

Make an appointment for processing at your county sheriff's office. Some counties, such as Wayne County, limit processing to 20 applicants daily and suggest CCW applicants call to make an appointment for processing. The fee will be $67 if you have been a Ohio resident for more than 5 years, or $91 if you have been a resident for less than 5 years on new applications.

About the Author

Based near Chicago, Sameca Pandova has been writing since 1995 and now contributes to various websites. He is an attorney with experience in health care, family and criminal prosecution issues. Pandova holds a Master of Laws in health law from Loyola University Chicago, a Juris Doctor from Case Western Reserve University and a Bachelor of Arts in history and political science from Case Western.

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