How Can I Get My Traffic Ticket Waived?

By J. Johnson
A traffic ticket is given by a police officer on duty.

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Getting a traffic ticket can be a stressful event for some people. There are various types of violations you might be accused of when receiving a traffic ticket, with one of the most common traffic violations being a speeding ticket. If you feel you were unjustly given the ticket and you want to avoid the penalties that come with it, there are some things you can do to try to get the traffic ticket waived.

Study the traffic ticket carefully. If you find mistakes, such as not listing your name properly or failing to list a specific traffic violation, be prepared to explain this to the judge and ask that the ticket be waived.

Go to the notice hearing for the traffic ticket. Plead "not guilty" in front of the judge. The judge will then assign a date for your trial in which you will need to reappear in court. If you found mistakes on the ticket, mention them and ask that the ticket be waived. The judge might waive it on the spot.

Find out your state's laws for a fair and speedy trial for the type of violation for which you've been accused. If the date you are to appear in court goes beyond this time frame, you can get the ticket waived.

Gather evidence in your favor. This can be witness testimonies or statements or evidence attempting to prove the police officer did not have a clear view of your vehicle when witnessing the alleged violation. Photographs can be used in this case, along with witness testimony, if possible. Another option is to prove that the violation you committed was necessary for safety, such as driving over the speed limit to get ahead of the car in front of you to allow an ambulance to get by.

Explain your case to the judge on the day you are to appear in court. Bring any witnesses willing to speak on your behalf and let them talk as well. Hopefully, once the judge hears your side of the story, the traffic ticket will be waived.

About the Author

J. Johnson has been completing freelance writing work since September 2009. Her work includes writing website content and small client projects. Johnson holds a degree in English from North Carolina State University.

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