How to Remove a Name From a Property Deed in Maryland

By Teo Spengler - Updated March 31, 2017

To remove your name from a property deed in Maryland, convey your interest to the other people listed as owners on the deed. A quit claim deed is fastest and easiest.

Requirements for Deeds in Maryland

In order to remove a name from a property deed in Maryland, use any type of deed that is valid and enforceable to convey your interest in the property to the other owners.

For property conveyance deeds to be enforceable in Maryland, they must be in writing, executed and recorded. The person granting the interest must sign the deed and acknowledge the signature before a judge of a court of record, a clerk or deputy clerk of a court, a notary public or a master in chancery. The officer taking the acknowledgement must attach a certificate to the deed.

To record a deed in Maryland, attach a completed Intake Sheet to the deed. You must also pay the transfer tax. Record real estate deeds with the Recorder of Deeds in the Circuit Court in whichever Maryland county the property is located.

Removing a Name from House Deeds

Removing your name or the name of any consenting individual from a property deed in Maryland is a simple matter of filing a quit claim deed. Unlike warranty deeds, quit claim deeds do not make any guarantees about the size or type of interest conveyed. Rather, quit claim deeds convey all of the interest a person has in the property, whether that be a life estate, a 50 percent interest or a 1 percent interest.

This limitation makes accepting a quit claim deed risky for someone buying from a stranger. The buyer might think that he is purchasing a larger interest than the grantor is actually conveying. But when you are quitclaiming your interest to other current owners, the transaction does not carry much risk.

Preparing a Quit Claim in Maryland

It's easy enough to draw up a quit claim deed in Maryland, and quit claim deed forms are easy to find online. The trick to preparing a quit claim in Maryland is that quit claim procedures, attachments and formatting vary from county to county in this state.

You can visit the Circuit Court in the county in which the property is located and request a quit claim form. But you can also search for the form on Deeds.com. Enter the name of the county in the search box and get a form and some instructions for proper preparation of the quit claim.

Before you go through the trouble, look up the recorded deed to be sure your name is on the deed and confirm the other owners to whom you will transfer your interest. You can do this online at Public Searches Maryland Land Records and Deeds Search. The website lists the counties alphabetically, then provides a search engine for deeds in that county. If it happens that your county doesn't have a searchable data base, call the office or visit it in person to request the deed.

About the Author

Teo Spengler earned a J.D. from U.C. Berkeley's Boalt Hall. As an Assistant Attorney General in Juneau, she practiced before the Alaska Supreme Court and the U.S. Supreme Court before opening a plaintiff's personal injury practice in San Francisco. She holds both an M.A. and an M.F.A in creative writing and enjoys writing legal blogs and articles. Her work has appeared in numerous online publications including USA Today, Legal Zoom, eHow Business, Livestrong, SF Gate, Go Banking Rates, Arizona Central, Houston Chronicle, Navy Federal Credit Union, Pearson, Quicken.com, TurboTax.com, and numerous attorney websites. Spengler splits her time between the French Basque Country and Northern California.

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