The Mailing Instructions for IRS Form SS-4

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IRS Form SS-4 enables you to obtain an Employer Identification Number (EIN) number. You have a few options when it comes to sending in your SS-4 form, including online filing, fax submission or submission via postal mail. You may request copies of the form by phone and have it sent by mail or fax.

IRS Form SS-4 enables you to obtain an Employer Identification Number. The EIN is a nine-digit number that is used to track income and taxes for a variety of entities including employers, corporations, estates and even certain individuals. Starting a business isn’t the only reason that you would need to have an EIN. To make certain that you have one of these numbers if you need it, contact your tax preparer or local IRS office. Once you know if you need to have an EIN, use IRS Form SS-4 to get one.

Get Form SS-4 Online

When it comes time to file for an EIN, you’ll need to complete IRS Form SS-4, following the SS-4 instructions closely. You have a few options when it comes to sending in your SS-4 form, and you should choose whichever is the most convenient for you. The first of these is to apply through the IRS website. It is important to remember that this is a free service provided by the IRS, so they will never ask you for any payment information. When you apply for an EIN online, you should get your nine-digit number immediately. This can be convenient for small business owners or others who need to get up and running with an EIN very quickly.

What’s the IRS Fax Number?

You can also fax your completed SS-4 form as a PDF to 855-641-6935. Before you fax your SS-4 documents, check to make sure that all of the needed information is legible on your form. You can either supply a return fax number or wait to get your EIN by mail. If you do fax your SS-4 to the IRS with a return fax number, expect to receive your EIN within four business days.

Where to Mail the SS-4 Form to Get an EIN

If you choose to apply by mail, be aware that the processing time for obtaining an EIN is about four weeks. To ensure that your form is processed in a timely manner, verify that the form contains all the required information. For better processing, make sure to include a contact number and valid address for sending your EIN to you. Mail the form to Internal Revenue Service, Attn: EIN Operation, Cincinnati, OH 45999.

Obtaining Copies of Forms

Provided you have your Employer Identification number, you can contact the IRS by phone at 800-829-4933, Monday through Friday, 7 a.m. through 7 p.m. in your timezone. You will have to give the representative on the phone details about your position within your business and provide other identifying information. For example, they may ask how you are affiliated with the business or if you received an EIN from them in the past. After that, the representative can release a copy of the form to you.

If you don’t have a copy of your EIN document on hand there are a few ways to find the number. If you have the original notice issued by the IRS when you applied for your EIN, it should be noted on that form. Other ways to find your EIN include contacting the IRS Business and Specialty Tax Line at 800-829-4933. In addition, if you used your EIN to open an account or get a license, the authenticating entity, such as your bank, should be able to get the number for you. If you have filed taxes with the EIN, your records will have it on those tax documents.

If you require the information immediately, it is best that you use the internet or the phone between the hours of 7 a.m. and 7 p.m. in your timezone. Otherwise, agents will have to use regular post or fax and that will delay processing time.

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About the Author

Danielle Smyth is a writer and content marketer from upstate New York. She holds a Master of Science in Publishing from Pace University. Her experience includes years of work in the insurance, workers compensation, disability, and background investigation fields. In addition to being the content writer and social media manager for Alliance Worldwide Investigative Group, she has written on legal topics for a number of other clients. She owns her own content marketing agency, Wordsmyth Creative Content Marketing (www.wordsmythcontent.com) and enjoys writing legal articles and blogs for clients in related industries.