How to Check to See If Your License Is Suspended in Utah

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Driving on a suspended license in Utah carries serious penalties, so if you have doubts or questions about your legal driving status you, and certain third parties approved under the Driver Privacy Protection Act, can request your driving record online, in person or by the mail.

Driving with a suspended license is illegal in any state, and the penalty for doing so in Utah can be up to six months in jail and up to a $750 fine. If you are unsure about the status of your driving privileges, it’s in your best interest to conduct a Utah driver license check before you get behind the wheel. In Utah, the Department of Motor Vehicles and the Utah Driver License Division are separate governmental agencies; the DMV deals with vehicle registrations, while the DLD licenses motorists. Driving records can be obtained online, in person or by mail by anyone who is authorized under the Driver Privacy Protection Act.

Who Can Access a Motor Vehicle Record

To determine whether you have a suspended license in Utah, request a copy of your driving record from the Driver License Division. The driving record, known as a Motor Vehicle Record, gives you information about any citations, arrests, suspensions or revocations you’ve received in the past three years. DUI and drug-related incidents stay on a driving record for 10 years.

Anyone can access their own Motor Vehicle Record, but it is also possible for certain other people to access your MVR as well. The Driver Privacy Protection Act outlines when it is permissible for a third party to request an MVR:

  • A government agency may obtain an MVR if needed to conduct its functions.
  • An MVR can be accessed for use in connection with court proceedings.
  • Insurers or insurance support agencies may access MVRs.
  • Licensed private investigators may obtain MVRs for certain reasons.
  • Employers may access driving records to check commercial driver license information.
  • Anyone can request the MVR of another person if they have that person’s written consent.

Conduct a Utah Driver License Check Online

Motor Vehicle Records are available online, in person or by mail. To request your personal driving record online, visit Utah’s personal driving record portal. Through this online service, you can purchase your personal MVR using a credit or debit card, but only if the billing information for your card matches the address on file with your driver license record.

Utah also allows companies conducting pre-employment screening and background checks to access MVRs. The company must create a Utah.gov account, fill out a business account and then wait for approval before conducting driver history records searches.

Conduct a Driver License Check by Mail or In Person

To request a driving record online or in person, you must fill out the correct form and pay a fee. Driving record request forms can be found on the DLD website or at a driver license office. For a personal MVR, fill out form DLD60. Commercial Driver License employers, insurance agencies and any other requestors must fill out form DLD60b, which requires the driver's signature to be notarized and dated within 90 days of when the form is submitted. Requests for driving records made by a government agency, for the purposes of court proceedings or investigations must fill out form DLD60a.

In-person requests can be made at any driver license office, and the fee for a regular or a CDL driving record is $8.00. Certified MVRs, which can only be obtained in person at the administrative office in Salt Lake City, require the additional form DLD266 and cost $10.75.

To obtain a copy of a driving record by mail, send the completed form with a check for $8.00 for a regular or CDL driving record, or $10.75 for a certified driving record. Make checks payable to Utah Department of Public Safety and mail to:

Department of Public Safety
Driver License Division
P.O. Box 144501
Salt Lake City, UT 84114

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About the Author

Sally Brooks is a writer living in New York City with her chunky toddler and patient husband. She graduated magna cum laude from the University Cincinnati College of Law and her work has been featured in Jurist and the Temple Political and Civil Rights Law Review.

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