Regulations for Moving Mobile Homes in Georgia

By Tina Carpenter - Updated March 24, 2017
White mobile home not yet affixed to a foundation

1755 House Moving image by Paul Coskery from Fotolia.com

If you want to move a mobile home in Georgia there are rules in place to ensure a safe relocation. For example, you will need to obtain permission to move the mobile home from your county. If relocating to a new county, educate yourself on specific county regulations. Transporting a mobile home through Georgia from a different state to another does not require permission. There are regulations that you must satisfy before, during, and after moving your mobile home.

Prepare the New Site

Confirm that the property you are moving your home to is legally prepared for the mobile home. Mobile homes may only be placed on a property that has zoning clearance. If the property does not have city water, the owner is responsible for obtaining a septic tank permit. Get zoning clearance for this. If there is a septic tank in place, get an updated inspection and approval of the system. A well may also be needed. If the new property does not have a driveway, obtain a driveway construction permit.

Prepare Your Mobile Home for the Move

Not all mobile homes qualify for a moving permit in Georgia. Older homes, for example, may need an inspection to check that the mobile home meets reasonable health and safety and aesthetic standards before a moving permit is issued. A building permit may be required from your new county. Your title will be needed to prove that you own your home. Ask what fees are associated with the permits needed to satisfy regulations.

Check Georgia Transportation Regulations

A professional mobile home mover is needed to transport your mobile home. A mover should have everything needed for the move and be familiar with Georgia transportation regulations. It is illegal for someone to remove and transport a residence without the proper equipment, permits, insurance and clearances. Only a vehicle that is built for towing such heavy loads is legally allowed to do so. A driver with a commercial driver's license (CDL) endorsement is required to transport your mobile home. The Governor's Office of Consumer Affairs states, “Unlicensed movers operating outside the law may provide little or no protection for loss or damage to your property.”

Reassemble and Inspect

The mobile home will need to be inspected after it has arrived at its new location. If the home has been disassembled, it will need close inspection before and after reassembly. Each mobile home must have tie-downs or other equipment to secure stability. A certificate of occupancy may be required at your new property. A tax location decal should be displayed visibly on the mobile home, this proves you are up to date on your taxes. Licensed contractors are needed to set up utilities after your mobile home is in place and secured. Your drive way and septic system must be completed and ready for use. Your county may require a final inspection after all work has been completed.

About the Author

Tina Carpenter began writing professionally in 2005 as a freelance writer. She has a strong background providing content for companies based in the United States, United Kingdom and Australia. Tina studied creative writing and is currently studying computer science at Gloucester County College.

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