How do I Check for Warrants in Kansas?

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There are several ways to check for active warrants in Kansas. Online databases, law enforcement and legal professionals are your main resources.

In Kansas, arrest warrants never expire, except when a suspect dies or is apprehended by police. If you suspect there may be a warrant out for your arrest in Kansas, getting it taken care of is the best thing you can do. Finding an active warrant could require you to do jail time or pay a fine, depending on the nature of the offense.

Call the local courthouse. This is by far the least painful of your options; however, it only works if you know the county in Kansas where you suspect the warrant is active. The courthouse will only have information about offenses committed within its jurisdiction.

Hire an attorney, as he has access to records from any county in the state. However, courthouses and police departments have no legal obligation to share information with anyone not listed on warrants. Keep in mind that hiring an attorney incurs a large expense. If he is unable to get any information, you could spend a large sum and still not know if there are warrants out for your arrest.

Call the sheriff's department in the jurisdiction where you suspect a warrant may be active. Provide your full name, date of birth and social security number. Calling the sheriff's station gives the police reason to believe you will be turning yourself in if there is an active warrant for your arrest. Remember that the police can track the location of the phone from which you call. If the nature of your offense is egregious enough, they will find and apprehend you.

Make an appearance at the county jail or courthouse. If you decide to do this and find a warrant out for your arrest, you will go to jail immediately and stay there until a judge can see you. This usually takes three to 30 business days, depending on the offense. You will not be eligible for release on bail because you have already run from the warrant, and they do want you to run again.

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About the Author

Shaikyra James has been writing professionally since 2001. She has 10 years experience as a police officer and is also a veteran of the U.S. Armed Forces. James currently contributes to eHow focusing on law enforcement and legal subjects. James has a Bachelor of Science in criminal justice from Ellis University.