How to Withdraw a Naturalization Application

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A withdrawal of your naturalization application from USCIS may be necessary if you are no longer married to your U.S. citizen spouse, or if you made a material false statement on your application. By requesting to withdraw your naturalization application, you are agreeing to forfeit all previously paid USCIS fees pertaining to your case. Therefore, if you later decide to apply for the same benefit, you must submit new immigration fees. Unless you were convicted for a crime, a withdrawal of your naturalization application does not negatively affect your chances of applying for the same benefit in the future.

Locate the most recent correspondence you received from USCIS pertaining to your naturalization application. Find your application number, which is typically located at the top of the page. In some cases, USCIS may display a "Receipt Number" field instead.

Copy your USCIS application or receipt number. Write a letter addressed to the USCIS service center where you originally filed your naturalization papers. If you cannot remember the specific service center that processed your application, check all previous USCIS correspondences; USCIS correspondences are typically mailed by the service center processing your application.

Mail your letter via certified mail to the USCIS service center. Expect to receive confirmation that USCIS has canceled your application per your request within two weeks of receipt, if not less.

Tips

  • You also have the option of visiting your local USCIS office if you need additional assistance with the withdrawal process after mailing your letter to USCIS.

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About the Author

Eric Som has been writing professionally since 2002, contributing to various websites. He is certified through the Association of Certified Fraud Examiners. Som holds a Bachelor of Arts in English and a Bachelor of Laws from Handong Global University. He also has a Juris Doctor degree from an Ohio law school.

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