How to Obtain a Ten Year Driving Record

By Traci Bridges
Use your computer to obtain your driving record in minutes.

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Having a copy of your 10-year driving record can be helpful for many reasons. If you're applying for a job, you'll know beforehand what a company will find in a background search. When you're shopping for car insurance, your driving record could get you lower rates. You also might find a mistake that needs to be corrected. Thanks to modern technology, you no longer have to stand in long lines at the Department of Motor Vehicles to obtain this information. Your driving record is just a few clicks of the computer mouse away.

Log onto The Unofficial DMV Guide online (address listed in references). You will find a list of links to all 50 states in the U.S. and Washington, D.C. Click on the state that issued your driver's license and you will be taken to a new page for that state. Under products and services, click on driving records. Fill out the information to obtain an instant driving record. You will have a copy of your driving record within minutes for $39.95.

Go to your state's Department of Motor Vehicles Web site. You will need your driver's license number, your full name and address as it appears on your driver's license, the issue date of your driver's license and your date of birth. Most state Web sites will provide an unofficial copy online at no cost. You will need a credit or debit card to pay to have a certified copy mailed to you. Fees vary from state to state, but most charge no more than $30.

Send a written request for your 10-year driving record to your state's DMV office. Ask the department to mail you a certified copy. Include your full name as it appears on your license, driver's license number, date of birth and address. You will have to pay for the copy. Call your local DMV office to find out the fee for a certified copy. Mail in all required information, plus a check or money order to cover the fee and a copy of a valid ID to prove your identity. The DMV will send you a certified copy of your 10-year driving record via the postal service.

Visit your local DMV office. Tell the clerk you want a copy of your 10-year driving record. He or she will give you the appropriate forms to complete. Provide the required information and identification. Pay the appropriate fee for the certified copy.

About the Author

Traci Bridges is a veteran newspaper editor and reporter. She earned her bachelor's degree in political science with a minor in print journalism from The University of Alabama. She began writing for the "Morning News," a daily newspaper in South Carolina, in 1998. Since then, her work has appeared in several other publications including the "Winston-Salem Journal," "Tampa Tribune" and "AARP Magazine."

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