How to Change the Name on a Property Title in Maricopa County, AZ

By Trish Jackson - Updated April 10, 2017
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A deed of conveyance recorded at the Maricopa County Recorder's Office legally changes owner's names on real property. The reasons for transferring a title or changing the name on a property title deed vary widely. A deed of gift is often used when a parent gifts a property to a child. A quitclaim deed is used to relinquish interest by an owner, perhaps in a short sale. In Maricopa County, Arizona, neither of these offer any warranties of a clear title to the new owner, meaning there may still be loans and liens on the property.

Obtain the correct deed transfer document. You must record the original, signed and notarized document to the Maricopa County Recorder's Office. The deed must have a caption that summarized the type of document it is: gift or quitclaim deed.

Enter the full legal name of all parties to the transaction. The grantor is the current owner and the grantee is the acquiring party. Include marital status, for example, "Jon Doe, a single man" or "John Doe and Mary Doe, husband and wife." Enter the full legal name of the Grantee or new owner in the same way.

Fill out the type of consideration. This means the currency that changed hands for the purchase of the property. In the case of a gift, enter the cost of recording the deed. In Arizona, a deed of conveyance costs $15 to record with additional fees for items such as affidavits and mortgage deeds. The county website has a fee calculator to assist.

Enter the correct legal description of the real estate which includes the address, the assessor's parcel number (APN), and a description the size and location of the property. The legal description will be on the current title deed. If you do not have the deed, obtain a copy from the Maricopa County recorder's office.

Sign at the bottom if you are the Grantor. This must be done in the presence of a Notary Public and two witnesses, and the notary must sign and place her seal on the document. She will require picture identification and may ask you if you are sure you are signing of your own free will. The Grantee does not need to sign the document.

Obtain an affidavit of property value. Arizona requires buyers and sellers of real property to submit this with all real estate recordings if necessary. Quitclaim deeds are generally exempt, but the recorder's office will not allow the recording to proceed if you need one. The cost of recording this document once completed is an additional $2.00.

Record the document at the Maricopa County Recorder's office with applicable fees paid by cash or check made payable to: Maricopa County Recorder. The clerk will copy, stamp and return the document to you to complete the recording. The recorder's sticker or stamp will show the date and book and page in which the information is entered. This is now public record and Grantee is the new owner of the property.

About the Author

Trish Jackson is an author, blogger and freelance writer. Her second romantic suspense novel, "Redneck P.I.," was released in March 2011. Jackson particularly likes to write articles relating to life in the country, animals and home projects and has kept a blog focusing on this since 2006.

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