How to Write a Letter to the Judge for Driving Privileges

By Teo Spengler - Updated June 05, 2017
Police Officer Approaches Female Driver

It's the adult version of grounding a teenager: the revocation of driving privileges always feels like a punishment and often it is. You can lose your right to drive if you have medical issues or fail to pay child support, but generally license suspensions occur after you act irresponsibly on the road. Sometimes writing a letter can help.

License Suspensions

You can lose your right to drive for serious driving offenses, including driving under the influence of alcohol. State laws differ as to how DUI convictions are punished, but most allow drivers at some point in their suspensions to petition the court to reinstate driving privileges on a limited basis.

Request for Driving Privileges

If you want to request that the judge reinstate your driving privileges before the suspension is up, know that each jurisdiction has its own procedures and you should follow them exactly. Generally you must establish why it is critical that you have limited driving privileges to get to work or school or to perform your job. Some states grant limited driving privileges if you need to drive to medical appointments or court-ordered treatment.

Things to Consider

If you meet the reinstatement requirements of your particular state and have paid all of your tickets and fines, you may be granted limited driving privileges. However, if you failed a court-ordered medical or driving test, owe a payment due to a motor vehicle accident, lost your license due to driving while intoxicated (DWI) or you have been convicted of a felony involving a motor vehicle, your request to drive may be turned down. Increase your chances for being approved for limited or restricted driving privilege by meeting all of the necessary prerequisites.

About the Author

Teo Spengler earned a J.D. from U.C. Berkeley's Boalt Hall. As an Assistant Attorney General in Juneau, she practiced before the Alaska Supreme Court and the U.S. Supreme Court before opening a plaintiff's personal injury practice in San Francisco. She holds both an M.A. and an M.F.A in creative writing and enjoys writing legal blogs and articles. Her work has appeared in numerous online publications including USA Today, Legal Zoom, eHow Business, Livestrong, SF Gate, Go Banking Rates, Arizona Central, Houston Chronicle, Navy Federal Credit Union, Pearson, Quicken.com, TurboTax.com, and numerous attorney websites. Spengler splits her time between the French Basque Country and Northern California.

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