How to Write a Response Letter to an Eviction Notice

By Mike Johnson - Updated June 14, 2017
Eviction Notice

Responding to an eviction notice with a written response is extremely important if you want to have any chance of staying where you are, and want to avoid further legal implications. To write a good response, keep your letter short, concise and to-the-point. Be certain to file the response letter as soon as you possibly can after receiving the eviction notice. An eviction notice without a response signifies your agreement to the eviction.

Get an answer form from the court where the eviction notice has been filed. The court name and address should be provided at at the top of the eviction notice you received. The answer form is where you will be writing the response letter.

Fill in the name of the court and the court case number on the answer form as it appears on the eviction notice.

Add your landlord’s name, or the property manger that sent the eviction notice, in the space labeled "petitioner." Your name goes in the space labeled "defendant."

Write the response letter in the space provided on the answer form. If space is not provided, attach it separately. Read your lease to see how the landlord should conduct the eviction process, like giving you a written warning before filing the eviction with the court. If this process was deviated from in any way, it gives you a stronger case. Explain why you feel the process was not followed correctly, and why you believe the eviction is unjust.

Explain any other information that is pertinent to your case. For example, if your landlord is accusing you of not paying your rent on time (and you did pay on time) you can explain that you have copies of the rent checks that prove your case.

Check any boxes on the answer form that relate to your case. Some answer forms will include a place to check off various reasons why you should not be evicted, or complaints against the landlord or property. These can make your case stronger.

Sign and date the answer form in front of a notary at the court. Then file the answer form and response letter with the clerk of court.

About the Author

Mike Johnson has been working as a writer since 2005, specializing in fitness, health, sports, recreational activities and relationship advice. He has also had short stories published in literary journals such as "First Class Magazine." Johnson holds a Bachelor of Science in education and history from Youngstown State University.

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