How to Write a Letter to a Superior Court Judge

By Lindsey Hockman
Address a letter to a judge with a tone of respect.

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Contacting a judge by mail is a simple process. However, the tone and content of the letter must be carefully considered. Contacting an important figure of authority requires writing a professional, well thought-out message. A request will received more favorably when properly spelled and formatted and written with the appropriate tone of respect. You can accomplish this by following a simple letter-writing structure.

Search the Internet for the Superior Court contact information, as it varies by state. Write down the address provided, as there will be only one address for each judge. Copy the correct spelling of the judge's name along with the address.

Launch the word processing software. Hit "Enter" on the keyboard, allowing three spaces from the top of the page. Enter the date. Select "Enter" again to allow for three more spaces. Enter the judge's name and mailing address. Enter two more spaces, and address the judge accordingly with the first line of text as: "Dear Your Honor:" or "Dear Judge (name here)."

Insert two more spaces, and begin typing the letter to reflect the information for the judge's perusal. Take care with the tone of the letter's wording, so as to convey appropriate respect. Divide the letter into sections, depending on their subject matter. Allow one line space between paragraphs. Sign the letter with an appropriate closing -- "Thank you," or "Sincerely." Enter three spaces for a handwritten signature, followed by your typed name.

Run the Spell Check function on the software. Read through the letter to catch any further errors, and to ensure the content is not objectionable. Correct any mistakes or spacing issues. Print the letter and sign it. Place the letter in an envelope with the same mailing address listed on the letter. Place a stamp on the envelope, and mail.

About the Author

Since 1995 Lindsey Hockman has been writing professionally for an advertising agency, and as a freelance copywriter, and volunteer for the Make-A-Wish Foundation. Her work has appeared on various websites, including Hello World Clothing. She received her Bachelor of Science in communications from Indiana University-Purdue University.

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