What Is a Verified Affidavit?

By Shannon Johnson
What Is a Verified Affidavit?

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A verified affidavit is a written document signed by an individual who swears under oath before a notary public that the statements contained within it are true. In most states, the affidavit must be verified to be used in court. These documents are voluntarily made and do not require cross-examination from the opposing side.

Who Can Make a Verified Affidavit

Affidavits can be made by anyone who understands the significance of an oath or affirmation and can state facts as they pertain to a dispute. There is no age requirement and criminal convictions do not bar a person from making a statement. In the case that someone is not mentally able to give an affidavit, a guardian may make it for them.

Functions

Verified affidavits are used most commonly in the business and judicial spheres to state the financial health of a company or the specifics of an item. In court, they can be used as evidence.

Contents

A verified affidavit must contain the factual statements or claims, the affiant's name and address, the date the document was made and where it was made, and a signature from the affiant and a notary public.

About the Author

Shannon Johnson has been a freelance writer since 2008, specializing in health and organic and green-living topics. She practiced law for five years before moving on to work in higher education. She writes about what she lives on a daily basis.

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