How to Become a Legal Guardian

By Racquel Ricci
A court may rule that someone is unable to make decisions for herself.

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A legal guardian is a court-appointed decision maker. When someone is unable to make decisions for himself, whether a result of a developmental disability, age-related disability or physical disability, the court may appoint a legal representative to make important decisions for him. This is where a guardian comes in. Individuals who are trained and certified as legal guardians are those the courts appoint to make important decisions for another individual if there is not a close relative able to take responsibility for that individual.

Go to the local or state court house. File a petition to become a legal guardian for the individual who you believe is incapable of making her own decisions. Petitions require that you prove that the individual is not capable of making her own decisions.

Compile medical and legal records for the individual. The court will require you to prove that the individual is not able to make legal, medical and day-to-day decisions that are in her best interests. You'll also need to satisfy the court that you have the individual's best interests in mind. The legal system will monitor your performance and actions.

Submit all relevant documents to the court. When you attempt to become a legal guardian, keep in mind that you are essentially requesting that the court system terminate most of the individual's civil rights. The court grants you the authority to make financial, living and a variety of other legal decisions for the individual.

About the Author

Racquel Ricci began writing in 1999, and has since worked as a grant writer for non-profit organizations and public school systems. She runs competetively and writes often about exercise and fitness. Ricci has a Bachelor of Arts degree from the University of New Mexico in psychology.

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