How to Sue a Bus Company

By George Lawrence J.D.
If you were injured by a bus company, you may have cause to sue the company for your injuries.

Bus. Bus in parking area/ parking lot/ car park image by L. Shat from Fotolia.com

According to recentsettlements.com, on July 22, 2010, a bus accident between a Greyhound bus and an over-turned Trailblazer left fatalities and several people injured. The passengers of the Greyhound bus sued the bus company because they believed the driver was speeding at the time of the accident. Suing a bus company is similar to suing another entity. The plaintiff must have a legal right to sue the bus company. If the bus driver's actions cause you harm, you can sue the company in the proper court.

Determine the amount of your losses by adding bills and debts from medical treatment, lost wages and other pecuniary losses.

Balance the amount of damages you have suffered against the costs it will take to sue the company. If necessary, speak to an attorney to help you estimate the costs of initiating a lawsuit against the bus company.

Draft the complaint. Name the bus company as the defendant and name the bus driver as co-defendant. In the complaint, describe how the bus company injured you. Attach copies of your medical bills and lost wages to prove your damages.

File the complaint with the court clerk in the county where the accident occurred or in the county where the bus company has a place of business.

Deliver a copy of the complaint to an agent of the bus company. Hire a process server or send the compliant via first-class registered mail, return receipt requested.

Attend the hearings scheduled by the court to resolve the matter. You must prove your case by a preponderance of the evidence. This means that the jury must find your account of the facts is more likely true than the defendant's account.

About the Author

Based in Traverse City, Mich., George Lawrence has been writing professionally since 2009. His work primarily appears on various websites. An avid outdoorsman, Lawrence holds Bachelor of Arts degrees in both criminal justice and English from Michigan State University, as well as a Juris Doctor from the Thomas M. Cooley Law School, where he graduated with honors.

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