How to Dispute a Settlement Agreement

By Brooke Julia
Once you sign the agreement, it's binding.

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Settlement agreements are legal arrangements made in a variety of circumstances so that both parties are placated and further action is not necessary. Settlements are reached in divorce cases, civil lawsuits and discriminatory cases, just to name a few. Because both interested parties must sign the settlement agreement for it to go into effect, thereby proving that each understands and accepts it, it's nearly impossible to appeal a settlement decision.

Consult an attorney to bring your case before an appellate court, or a court that hears appeals, if your settlement was reached in court. You can legally represent yourself in a settlement agreement appeal, but the laws are confusing and difficult to navigate. Having a lawyer's experience and knowledge on your side is in your best interest.

Appeal the settlement with the appellate court in your area within 10 to 60 days of the court decision, depending on your case type and the state you live in. If your settlement arrangement was reached out of court, take the matter to a county court within the same time frame.

Provide documents and reasons to support your appeal. Appeals exist, not to provide you with a new trial, but to re-examine the established decision. A settlement agreement will be reversed only if you can prove that the decision was made against your will or against the law, or that the judge did not respond to the facts provided in a logical manner.

About the Author

Brooke Julia has been a writer since 2009. Her work has been featured in regional magazines, including "She" and "Hagerstown Magazine," as well as national magazines, including "Pregnancy & Newborn" and "Fit Pregnancy."

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