DIY Quit Claim in Maine

By George Lawrence J.D.
Maine quitclaim deeds, a quick way, an interest, real property

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Maine law requires that real property conveyances be put in writing, usually in the form of a deed. Some deeds, such as general warranty deeds, provide that the grantor (the person giving the property away) will defend title to the property and thcure any defects in the title. Quitclaim deeds do not contain these protections. In Maine the quitclaim deed is used to transfer ownership quickly, between parties that generally know each other and the land involved in the transfer. Transferring land that has been in the family for years from father to son is a common situation in which a quitclaim deed would be used.

Title the document "Quitclaim Deed." Write the following sentence to start the deed: "[Your name], of [your Address] for consideration paid, grant, convey, and forever quitclaim to [Name Receiving Interest], of [Name Receiving Interest's Address]."

Describe the property in section 2. Start the section by explaining "I, [Your Name] give title in [Land Address] to [Recipient's Name] by quitclaim deed. The land in question is located [give address]. Additionally, the land [provide details such as metes and bounds]." Look at the actual title or deed of the Maine property for the metes and bounds. List the address, and provide a brief description of the land.

Take the document to a notary public in Maine. Sign the document. Have the person receiving the interest in the land by the quitclaim deed sign the document. Have the notary public notarize the document.

Deliver the quitclaim deed to the person receiving the interest in the land. In Maine, transfers are not valid until there has been delivery and acceptance. Typically, acceptance is presumed, especially in favorable transfers (such as gifts). Delivery must be accomplished "actually" (by hand delivering it to the person) or "constructively" (a legal term to describe a symbolic conveyance, such as handing a person a branch from the property at issue along with the deed). Handing the deed to the person will accomplish delivery.

About the Author

Based in Traverse City, Mich., George Lawrence has been writing professionally since 2009. His work primarily appears on various websites. An avid outdoorsman, Lawrence holds Bachelor of Arts degrees in both criminal justice and English from Michigan State University, as well as a Juris Doctor from the Thomas M. Cooley Law School, where he graduated with honors.

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