How Do You Defer a Traffic Ticket?

By Robert Russell
a traffic ticket, insurance costs

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The primary purpose of a deferred traffic ticket is to allow you to maintain a clear driving record and keep your insurance costs down. In receiving a deferral, you are making an agreement with the court and paying a fee to keep the traffic violation off your driving record. You must submit a deferral request. If you are eligible, it is then a simple process of filling out paperwork, submitting it on time, and, if your request is granted, abiding by the agreement.

Find out whether you are eligible for a deferral. You are eligible for a deferral once every seven years. The actual details may vary with different jurisdictions. In some case the judge may deny the deferral. Certain moving violations, such as speeding in a construction zone or school zone or passing a school bus, will disqualify you from receiving a deferral.

Request a deferral form from the court that has jurisdiction over your case. You will receive a notice setting a hearing date for your case. Pay attention to the specific details: Some courts require that the deferral request be submitted seven days before the hearing date, while other courts require five days. It is essential to meet the deadline. You cannot request a deferral at the hearing.

Sign a deferral agreement and pay a deferral fee. Once the deferral is granted, the court will set a date for payment. The fee must be paid within this time. The fee typically ranges between $100 and $150. In signing the agreement, you are promising the court that you will not have any more infractions during the deferral period, which is typically one year.

Honor the deferral agreement. In honoring the agreement, you will be able to keep the traffic infraction off your driving record. If you don't comply, the ticket will be reported and you will have to pay the fine in addition to the deferral fee that you have already paid. The ticket will them go on your record and affect your insurance rates.

About the Author

Robert Russell began writing online professionally in 2010. He holds a Ph.D. in philosophy and is currently working on a book project exploring the relationship between art, entertainment and culture. He is the guitar player for the nationally touring cajun/zydeco band Creole Stomp. Russell travels with his laptop and writes many of his articles on the road between gigs.

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