How to Get a Peace Warrant

By Adeeba Folami
A visit, your local courthouse, a peace warrant

Palais de Justice de Montpellier image by Florian Villesèche from Fotolia.com

Obtaining a peace warrant requires that you submit a documented complaint to a judge, magistrate or other court officer--in a small town, it might be the mayor. Peace warrants can be granted when you feel you are in danger, or your family or property is under threat by another person. Peace warrants may not be in use in every county or city, so you must do preliminary checking to find out what laws are in place in your area.

Filing for a Peace Warrant

Find out if your city or county allows issuance of peace warrants. In places like Effingham County, Georgia, such filings are handled in Magistrate Court which is the place to start to find out where to submit your complaint. In some counties, peace warrants are not issued but good behavior warrants, which are similar, are used instead.

Hand write or type out and print your complaint. A typed document, however, is more professional, legible and easier to read than handwritten words. Also, be sure to proofread, or have someone do that for you, to catch any grammatical or spelling errors.

Find the location of your county courthouse and appear there to file your complaint with the Magistrate. Be aware that a filing fee may be required of you, but is typically waived in cases of domestic violence. The court clerk will advise you on your next steps and what actions you can expect after your complaint is submitted.

About the Author

Adeeba Folami is a freelance journalist residing in Denver, Colo. She was first published professionally in 1994. Folami's work has appeared in many publications, including "Denver Weekly News," "Afro American Newspapers," "Louisiana Weekly," "Dallas Weekly," "Mississippi Link," and "OpEd News."

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