How to Notarize a Document in New York

By Charles Hayward
Notary officials often work in banks.

Hemera Technologies/Photos.com/Getty Images

Certain documents, including property deeds and insurance forms, need to be notarized -- officially certified by a person authorized to do so. Once notarized, the item is legally binding. The process of having a document notarized is largely the same in each state, including New York, although they have specific requirements. With a little time and effort, you can have a document notarized within an afternoon.

Locate a notary. They normally work in banks, government offices, courthouses and insurance companies. Try your bank, and you probably won't be charged. Some notaries will come to your home or office for a fee.

Gather the documents that you need to have notarized and verify that they are complete. You will also need a valid form of identification. A notary will accept a driver's license, state-issued ID card, passport or military ID card.

Bring your documents and identification to the notary, who will examine them to determine their purpose and legibility. She may ask you questions about the documents. Answer her questions to the best of your ability.

Sign the documents when the notary hands them to you. You must sign them in her presence. She will stamp the documents with her official seal and make a record of her action.

Pay any fees associated with the service.

About the Author

Charles Hayward has been writing professionally since 2010, covering local government, schools and the occasional sporting event. He earned a Bachelor of Arts from Hampshire College, where his multidisciplinary studies included coursework in the social sciences and humanities.

Cite this Article A tool to create a citation to reference this article Cite this Article