How to Report My Caseworker

By Natalie Smith, Ph.D.
Caseworkers assist people in need in a variety of settings.

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Caseworkers who assist in welfare, child support or child protective services are often overwhelmed and have more clients than they can reasonably handle. In Texas, each caseworker for the Child Support Division of the Office of The Attorney General frequently has more than 600 cases. As a result, many people believe that their caseworkers are not providing them with adequate service. However, if your caseworker has purposefully and neglectfully ignored your case or treated you badly, you need to report him to his agency.

Gather evidence about your caseworker's negligence. For example, if you were told by the agency to expect her to return calls within 24 hours and she repeatedly fails to do so, make a note of the times and dates you have called and the times she returns your calls. Keep in mind, however, that caseworker response times may vary according to the caseworker's workload and the urgency of the matter. Print your phone records as supporting evidence.

Speak with your caseworker and tell him in a professional manner that you are not happy with the way he has been handling your case. Many agencies, such as the Texas Department of Child and Family Services, recommend that you address problems directly with your caseworker before you bring it to the attention of a supervisor. Be specific and provide concrete examples. Try to refrain from sounding accusatory or angry because he may become defensive and not truly listen to your problem. Document the date of the discussion and make a general outline of the conversation.

Wait to see if the caseworker's behavior changes. For example, has she been returning your telephone calls within the appropriate time frame? If she continues to ignore your case or not fulfill her duties, call the caseworker's agency and request an appointment with her supervisor.

Bring all of the documentation you created with you to the meeting. Discuss the situation in a calm and professional manner with the supervisor. Explain your position, and go through the documentation or other evidence with her. If you feel that you need a new caseworker, request one, otherwise specifically state what you want to happen as a result of this meeting.

About the Author

Natalie Smith is a technical writing professor specializing in medical writing localization and food writing. Her work has been published in technical journals, on several prominent cooking and nutrition websites, as well as books and conference proceedings. Smith has won two international research awards for her scholarship in intercultural medical writing, and holds a PhD in technical communication and rhetoric.

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