How to Get a Letter Certified

By Mike Johnson
Certified mail is a more secure way to send payments.

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Through the United States Postal Service, or USPS, you have the option of sending your mail as certified. This basically means that you will receive notice that your mail was received by the recipient. The main reason for sending certified mail would be if you were sending payment or other important documents. To get a letter certified, you just need to follow a simple procedure, which can be completed at your local neighborhood post office.

Bring your letter that you want certified to your local post office. Make sure the recipient's address and your address are already on the letter. If you need to, you can purchase a stamp to put on the letter while at the post office.

Have your letter weighed. To send it certified mail, it must weigh 13 oz. or less.

Let the postal service worker know that you would like to send the letter certified. There will be a short form to fill out.

Decide if you want to include any extras with the certified mail. For example, you can have it sent through priority mail, which will get the letter to the recipient in two to three days guaranteed. You can also ask for restricted delivery, which means the letter will only go to the recipient and no one else. Finally, the US Postal Service offers a Return Receipt for certified mail. This is a postcard that will be mailed to you and include the recipient's signature and the date and time the letter arrived.

Pay the fees associated with getting the letter certified. These fees are subject to change by the US Postal Service and cost more with each feature you add. However, they are typically nominal.

About the Author

Mike Johnson has been working as a writer since 2005, specializing in fitness, health, sports, recreational activities and relationship advice. He has also had short stories published in literary journals such as "First Class Magazine." Johnson holds a Bachelor of Science in education and history from Youngstown State University.

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