How to Renew a Passport in Michigan

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In Michigan, you can renew your current passport by applying in mail or in person. Passports are issued by the U.S. Department of State, which requires you to provide several documents and the appropriate fees. When you need a quick passport renewal in Michigan, you can expedite the process.

When you have an upcoming international trip planned, there’s one thing you don’t want to overlook – making sure your passport has not expired. If you need to renew your passport in Michigan, you can do so by mail or in person. As long as you have all of the documents you need and give yourself sufficient time to renew your passport, getting on the plane will be the least of your travel concerns.

TL;DR (Too Long; Didn't Read)

Renew your passport several months before it expires or before it will be needed. If renewing by mail, send the package with delivery confirmation and tracking to ensure it arrives safely. An expedited passport renewal costs $60 extra.

When You Need to Renew a Passport in Michigan

Once you are issued a U.S. passport, you must renew it at required intervals. When you'll need to renew a passport depends on the age at which you were issued the passport:

  • For children under age 16, a passport must be renewed every five years.
  • For those 16 and older, a passport must be renewed every 10 years.

Since you cannot travel internationally with an expired passport, it’s necessary to renew your passport at the required intervals to complete foreign travel.

Documents Needed to Renew a Passport in Michigan

Passports are issued by the U.S. Department of State, which requires several documents to be provided when you need a passport renewal:

  • A completed form, which varies depending on whether your passport is renewed by mail or in person.
  • Your current U.S. passport, which will be returned to you once your new passport is issued.
  • Any applicable name change documents, such as a marriage certificate or a divorce decree.
  • A current photo that meets the required specifications.
  • A check or money order for the required fees, which will be higher if you expedite renewal of your passport.

Without these documents, you will not be able to complete a passport renewal.

Renewing a Passport by Mail

If you have time to renew your passport by mail, it can be a more convenient option. However, you can only renew by mail if your current passport meets all of these requirements:

  • It is in like-new condition and not damaged.
  • You received it when you were at least 16 years old.
  • It is submitted with your application.
  • It was issued within the past 15 years.
  • It was issued using your current name.

If all of those apply, you can fill out U.S. Department of State Form DS-82 and mail it along with all of the required documents via the U.S. Postal Service to the National Passport Processing Center, P.O. Box 90155, Philadelphia, PA. Once all of the documents are processed, you will receive your renewed passport in the mail.

Renewing a Passport in Person

If you don’t meet the requirements to renew by mail or if you need your passport in a hurry, you can choose to do a passport renewal in Michigan in person. To do so, you must bring the needed documents to either a passport agency or an acceptance facility, depending on how quickly you need your passport. There is a chance you’ll need to apply for a new passport instead of renewing a current passport if you don’t have all the necessary documentation.

When Will I Get My Passport?

How long it takes to get your renewed passport depends on whether it was expedited. For a regular renewal, you should get your passport within four to six weeks. For an expedited passport, you should get it within two to three weeks. If you had an urgent need that required you to expedite your passport in person at a passport agency, you can get your passport in as soon as eight business days.

When you know that your passport will expire soon, it’s a good idea to go ahead and renew it a bit early so you aren’t scrambling at the last minute to get it done.

References

About the Author

Leslie Bloom earned a J.D. from U.C. Davis’ King Hall, with a focus on public interest law. She is a licensed attorney who has done advocacy work for children and women. She holds a B.S. in print journalism, and has more than 20 years of experience writing for a variety of print and online publications, including the Journal of Juvenile Law and Policy.

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