How to Get a License for Air Conditioning and Heating

By Sharon Guy
Some states require a license to repair air conditioners.

air conditioner vent image by Tammy Mobley from Fotolia.com

Many states require a license for the installation and maintenance of heating, ventilating and air conditioning (HVAC) units. An HVAC license is a type of contractor's license. Once a candidate fulfills the technical education requirements and gets work experience, he can take an exam to obtain a government or trade license.

Find out if your state requires an HVAC license. Search HVAC licensing page on the National Contractors website to find your state's requirements.

Click on the name of your state to find more details about what type of license is required. For example, Georgia requires an Air Contractors License, and you must have three years of experience and pass an exam. There is a link to the State Construction Industry Licensing Board Division of Conditioned Air Contractors Professional Examining Board.

Locate the name of the appropriate licensing board or business-licensing division in your state and visit its website to find out how to take the exam.

Attend an HVAC training school to ensure you can pass your state's examination. Visit the online HVAC Training Schools Directory for a list of schools.

Click on "Find Schools by Location" to search for HVAC training schools near you. Obtain the education you need to find employment and qualify for taking the licensing exam.

Once you have completed the educational and work experience requirements, prepare the application and pay the fee. For example, Georgia charges a $30 application fee and a $133 exam fee.

Take the state HVAC exam. Upon passing the exam, you will receive a license. If you fail the exam, apply to take it again. Check your state's requirements to see if there is a time limit for completing the exam. In Georgia, for example, you must pass the exam within two years from the date the initial application is approved.

About the Author

Sharon Guy is a freelance writer and attorney. She has been writing for law firms, businesses and nonprofit organizations since 2000. She holds a Juris Doctorate from Quinnipiac University School of Law and a Bachelor of Arts in fine art from Bard College.

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