What Is Theft in the 3rd Degree?

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The classification and punishment of third degree theft varies by state. Generally, this is the least severe type of theft and is classified as a misdemeanor.

Classification

Third degree theft is classified as a misdemeanor.
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Third degree theft is classified as a misdemeanor, meaning someone convicted of the crime cannot be indicted. The type of misdemeanor, however, varies by state. In Alaska and Alabama, for instance, third degree theft counts as a Class A misdemeanor, while in Oregon it qualifies as a Class C misdemeanor.

Value

The value of a theft and its classification varies by state.
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This value of the theft and its classification also varies by state. In Alabama, a Class C misdemeanor indicates the value of the stolen property is less than $500. This holds true in Alaska, but to qualify for third degree theft in that state, the value of the stolen property must be at least $50. And in Oregon, any theft of less than $100 qualifies as third degree theft.

Read More: The Difference Between Theft & Aggravated Theft

Punishment

The punishment for misdemeanors is determined by the state.
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The punishment for misdemeanors is determined by the state. In Alabama, after being convicted of third degree theft by a judge, a person will be fined up to $6,000 and receive up to one year in prison. In Alaska, Class A misdemeanors generally result in a fine up to $10,000, and in Oregon, a third degree theft charge will carry a maximum jail term of 30 days, and a maximum fine of $1,250.