OSHA Requirements on Footcandle Light Requirements

By Adelaide Damoah - Updated June 17, 2017
Three construction helmets hanging on a hat-rack

The Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) is a government organization that sets regulations for the safety of employees at work. A foot-candle is the United States unit of measurement of how much light is emitted from a light source. OSHA has set regulations on minimum light requirements in workplaces to ensure the safety of those working in areas where a certain amount of light is required to do the job safely and effectively.

3 Foot-Candles

OSHA regulations state that all of the following areas should be lit to a minimum of 3 foot-candles: active storage areas, excavation and waste areas, loading platforms, field maintenance areas, access ways and refueling areas.

5 Foot-Candles

OSHA standards state that a minimum of 5 foot-candles should be used to illuminate corridors, warehouses, hallways, general construction areas, and exit ways. The type of light source does not matter as much as the minimum amount of illumination provided. In the case of emergencies for those working underground, headlights are required.

10 Foot-Candles

During drilling, scaling or mucking in tunnels and shafts, a minimum of 10 foot-candles is required by OSHA standards. Mess halls, indoor toilets and storerooms must also be lit to 10 foot-candles.

30 Foot-Candles

In areas where precise and detailed work may be difficult to do under less light, 30 foot-candles are required. Examples where 30 foot-candles are required include hospital infirmaries, offices and first aid stations.

About the Author

Adelaide Damoah has been writing since 1995. Her work appears on eHow and she has experience with academic writing, web content, newsletters and news releases. Her expertise includes health and art. Damoah holds a Bachelor of Science in applied biology from Kingston University.

Cite this Article A tool to create a citation to reference this article Cite this Article