How do I Find Court Records for an Ontario, Canada Warrant?

By Andrew Latham - Updated March 23, 2017
Court documents

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In Ontario, Canada, most court documents are publicly accessible unless a court order or common law ruling restricts its access. Each court manages its own records and is responsible for creating the guidelines and procedures that govern their access. You can request a copy of any public document, including warrants, as long as you are authorized to view the document and you pay the photocopying fee.

DIY Route

Visit the originating or filing court that holds the warrant you are looking for. If you do not know which Ontario court has your documents, the Ministry of the Attorney General has an online list of Ontario courthouses you can search. The online list allows you to to search courthouses by municipality and court department: family, criminal, divisional, enforcement, small claims and court of appeal.

Request an application form from the records office of the courthouse. You will have to provide your name, address and purpose for requesting the warrant record.

Pay the processing fee. The cost for viewing and copying public documents varies from region and court and may change at any time. For example, the cost in 2010 for copies of warrants in a provincially-administered court record is $1 for a document without certification and $3.50 per page if it requires certification.

Public Records Access Companies

Visit a Canada Warrant online search website such as, Info Cubic or Abika. These outfits will search and request a copy of a warrant for a fee.

Fill in their search form. The form will require personal information such as the person's name, address, age, nationality and period you wish to search for.

Pay the search fee and view the warrants you requested. Costs vary by provider, urgency and delivery method. In 2010, Info Cubic charged $35 for a report on a Canadian warrant search.

Warning

Most public records search companies will search for warrants through the Ontario District Courthouse. However, not all local court records are stored at the District Courthouse so you may want to confirm the company also searches the records of local courts.

About the Author

Andrew Latham is a seasoned copywriter for both print and online publishers. He has a Bachelor of Science, majoring in English, a diploma in linguistics and a special interest in finance, science, languages and travel. He is the owner of LanguageVox.com, a company based in Charlottesville, Virginia, which provides writing, interpreting and translating services for English and Spanish audiences.

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