List of OSHA Training

By Shawn Lealos
OSHA offers training classes to help deal with hazardous situations in the work place.

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The Occupational Safety and Health Administration requires employers to train their employees in safety- and health-related areas. Training is required in fields dealing with hazardous chemicals, occupational health, fire protection, welding, cutting and brazing.

Toxic and Hazardous Substances

The Department of Labor requires the implementation of hazardous chemical training programs for employees working in chemical manufacturing laboratories and chemical importing occupations. Employers must insure lab employees receive training in these areas. The training includes providing information to cover flammability and carcinogenicity. Training also can also deal specifically with certain chemicals. The training will involve methods and observations to detect hazardous chemicals, the health hazards of the chemicals and the measures the employee can protect themselves from the hazards.

Construction

The training program for employees working in demolition and construction occupations enables employees to deal with the hazards of the job. The training includes the nature of falls in the work area and the procedures for maintaining and inspecting the fall protection systems. The training also includes the uses of guardrails, safety nets, monitoring systems, warning lines, access zones and personal fall arrest systems. The employees also learn their individual roles in the monitoring the system, the limitations of equipment and the handling of equipment and materials integral to safety procedures.

Outreach Training Program

The Outreach Training Program involves ten hours of courses providing industry workers with awareness on preventing and recognizing hazards. OSHA recommends the training as an orientation to hazards control and prevention. Courses include an introduction to OSHA and guides for fall protection, exit routes, fire prevention, emergency action plans, protective equipment, electrical safety and hazard communication. The outreach program also includes specialized industry lessons in medical, maintenance, utility and office ergonomics.

About the Author

Shawn Lealos has been writing professionally since 1996. His articles have appeared in magazines such as Inside Sports and on websites such as 411mania.com. He works as a film critic and is a member of the Oklahoma Film Critics Circle. Lealos received a Bachelor of Arts in journalism from the Gaylord School of Journalism at the University of Oklahoma in 2000.

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