Airsoft Gun Laws & Regulations in Indiana

By Tom Pace
Airsoft is a popular activity in Indiana

Airsoft Scene image by DanielC from Fotolia.com

Airsoft is a popular activity in Indiana, as there are numerous groups across the state that provide a chance to participate. As with any activity, comply with all safety and legal regulations when using airsoft guns. While Indiana has relatively lax gun laws, it’s important to understand the law at the local, state, and federal levels of government.

Local Regulations

Broadly speaking, it’s unlikely that your local municipality will have a prohibition on airsoft guns. However, use of airsoft guns in a public area may incur the risk of legal infractions such as disorderly conduct. If you are unsure, local regulations in Indiana take place at the township level and should be investigated by contacting the municipal office. Use of airsoft guns on private property requires consent of the property owner.

Indiana State Law

Indiana’s weapons regulations are defined in Title 35, Article 47 of the Indiana Code. Article 47 defines “firearms” as “any weapon that is capable of expelling… a projectile by means of an explosion.” Airsoft guns, which are powered by compressed air, are not regulated by the state gun laws. While Article 47 may be amended to all types of weapons, the only other weapons besides firearms explicitly mentioned in Article 47 are switchblade knives, “Chinese throwing stars”, and electric pulse weapons such as tasers.

Federal Guidelines

Airsoft guns are essentially designated as toys at the federal level. However, there are specific guidelines regarding the proper manufacture and sale of airsoft guns. Airsoft guns must be sold with distinctive markings that would distinguish them from actual firearms. This is generally accomplished with bright orange paint at the muzzle of the gun barrel.

About the Author

Tom Pace has been writing since 2000. His work has been featured by websites such as I-Mockery and his first book was published by Virtual Bookworm in 2005. Pace has been trained to coach students preparing for the GRE. He is pursuing a Bachelor of Arts in religious studies at the University of Chicago.

Cite this Article A tool to create a citation to reference this article Cite this Article