How to Amend an Affidavit

By Judy Kilpatrick
Going over documents with an adviser.

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An affidavit is a document, typically notarized by a notary public, to declare certain facts or data to be true. An affidavit typically has a standard format, with demographic information, such as name and address of the person making the document, the location where affidavit is signed, and enumerated statements of fact. The person making the affidavit swears before a notary public that the information provided in the affidavit is true. An affidavit can be used in legal proceedings, in which case, false statements made under oath are considered perjury. To maintain the integrity of the affidavit, it may become necessary to make changes, or amendments to the affidavit.

Reference the original affidavit. If the affidavit has an identifying number, then use this number, along with the date of the affidavit and the name of the person making the document. If the affidavit has no identifying number, then reference the affidavit by date and name of the person making the affidavit.

Reaffirm the statements of fact contained in the enumerated statements of the affidavit. To reaffirm the original statements use language such as, "I reaffirm the statements of fact contained in the affidavit made by [name] before notary [name] on [date]."

Make changes to the affidavit by providing additional information. There are many reasons to make changes to an affidavit: the name of the person that signed it may have changed due to marriage or other reason, the address may have changed, or new facts may have come to light. In all cases, the new data should be included in an enumerated statement.

Sign before a notary public. This new document is a new affidavit and should be executed in like manner to the original affidavit.

About the Author

For Judy Kilpatrick, gardening is the best mental health therapy of all. Combining her interests in both of these fields, Kilpatrick is a professional flower grower and a practicing, licensed mental health therapist. A graduate of East Carolina University, Kilpatrick writes for national and regional publications.

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