Smoke Detector Regulations for Arizona

By Jodee Redmond
Smoke detectors save lives.

fire detector on ceiling image by StarJumper from Fotolia.com

Arizona lawmakers have set specific smoke detector regulations to keep residents safe. New home builders must install smoke detectors in their units, and Arizona residents must dispose of smoke detectors in a safe manner when the units need to be replaced.

General Information

The Phoenix Fire Department recommends that Arizona residents install a smoke detector on every level of their homes. Install a smoke detector outside of sleeping areas. For maximum protection, place one in each bedroom. The smoke detector batteries should be changed when the unit starts making a beeping sound, and the entire unit should be replaced every 10 years.

New Homes

Under Arizona law, building contractors must install a smoke detector in all new residential units. Installation occurs during the building phase of the project. When renovation work is performed on an existing property requiring a building permit for a sleeping area, the builder installs a smoke detector as well.

Smoke Detectors and Rental Units

When a tenant moves into a new housing unit or a renovated living space, the tenant must maintain the smoke detector. The tenant informs the landlord in writing if the unit is malfunctioning. The landlord must repair the smoke detector if he is notified in writing that the unit is not functioning properly.

Child Care and Adult Care Facilities

Licensed child care and adult care facilities in Arizona must have a working smoke detector installed in all activity areas and the kitchen of the premises. The unit may be battery-operated or it may be hard-wired into the facility's electrical system. The hard-wired style smoke detector must be equipped with a battery back-up. All smoke detectors must be tested monthly.

Disposing of Ionization Smoke Detectors

Dispose of ionization smoke detectors in Arizona by sending the unit back to the manufacturer. Since these products contain americium-241, which is a low-level radioactive material, the manufacturers must accept old units and dispose of them in a proper manner.

About the Author

Jodee Redmond is a freelance writer, author, editor, blogger and award-winning Internet researcher. She is a graduate of Centennial College in Toronto who has been freelancing since 2000. Jodee has also worked as a tax consultant, in sales and was a legal assistant for a number of years.

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