Florida Parking Lot Laws

By Etch Tabor
Florida, the the property owner, a parking lot, the premises

full parking lot image by Aaron Kohr from Fotolia.com

For the most part, Florida's parking lot laws resemble those in most other states. Disabled parking criteria, speed limits and parking lot maintenance are all fairly standard codes for municipalities. However, Florida does have a controversial law regarding the storage of firearms in motor vehicles. The Florida court system has held up this law as lying within the boundaries of the law under the state constitution.

Disabled Parking

Those who possess disabled parking permits may park for free in most Florida lots. However, exceptions exist. Specifically, entertainment venues owned by the government can lift free parking for some vehicles displaying disabled parking permits. Lots can place restrictions on how many days in a row a vehicle, even with a permit, can park.

Firearms in Parking Lots

Florida law permits vehicle owners to keep firearms in their vehicles parked in their workplace parking lots, granted that they possess a concealed weapon permit. The law that permits employees to conceal and carry guns in their workplace vehicles, known as the Preservation and Protection of the Right to Keep and Bear Arms in Motor Vehicles Act passed in 2008. One only need to obtain a concealed weapon license from the Florida Department of Licensing, a subdivision of the Florida Department of Agriculture and Consumer Affairs. Gun owners need not display the permit in the vehicle.

Parking Lot Speed Limits

Speed limits in Florida parking lots range from 10 to 15 miles per hour.

Maintenance Requirements

Florida law requires property owners, to maintain their parking lots. This includes providing adequate lighting and removing debris.

About the Author

For three years, Etch Tabor worked as the technology and online editor at "InsideCounsel" magazine, a national publication for in-house counsel. He currently is a full-time freelance writer, specializing in legal, technology and comedy writing. He graduated in 2004 from the University of Missouri-Columbia with a degree in journalism.

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