How to Check If a Fraudulent Change of Address Was Made

By Stephanie Mojica - Updated June 06, 2017
United States Post Office

Checking your credit report and postal records is the easiest way to find out whether any incorrect addresses are listed. Unknown residences listed could mean someone obtained a fraudulent address change in your name. Fraudulent address changes are commonly associated with identity theft, in which someone takes another’s personal information to obtain credit cards and loan accounts.

Check Postal Records

Visit your local post office office during normal business hours. If you don’t know the correct location or hours, call (800) ASK-USPS or visit usps.com. Ask the postal clerk to check the records and see if any address changes were made in your name. You will likely be asked to prove your identity with a state-issued photo ID. If you didn't authorize any changes, tell the postal employee. This will create a report as well as reverse any fraudulent changes.

Check Your Credit Reports

Equifax, Experian and TransUnion are the major agencies handling consumer financial information in the United States. You can get one free copy each year at AnnualCreditReport.com. If you already saw your free reports, visit each credit bureau’s website separately to order new copies. You’ll need a credit or debit card to purchase the information. If you don’t have this payment method, call each credit bureau: Equifax, (800) 685-1111; Experian, (888) 397-3742; and TransUnion, (800) 888-4213. They can advise you how to order your report copies through postal mail. Fill out the order forms from AnnualCreditReport.com or Equifax, Experian and TransUnion. Provide all required information, including your full name, Social Security number, current address and date of birth. You’ll also be required to answer multiple-choice identity-verification questions. The information required could be anything from the name of a relative to a former or current bank.

Report Fraudulent Address Change

If your address has been changed without your knowledge, then you could be the unwitting victim of identity theft. Call or visit your local police station to file reports if either of the above methods shows a fraudulent address change.

About the Author

Stephanie Mojica has been a journalist since 1997 and currently works as a full-time reporter at the daily newspaper "The Advocate-Messenger" in Kentucky. Her articles have also appeared in newspapers such as "The Philadelphia Inquirer" and "The Virginian-Pilot," as well as several online publications. She holds a bachelor's degree from Athabasca University.

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