How to Immigrate From Germany to Canada

By Mallory Ferland

Immigrating to Canada from Germany requires the same process and procedure as immigrating to Canada from France or Brazil. You must work through the Canadian foreign embassy in Berlin or one of the Canadian Consulate Generals. You must secure eligibility for immigration before you begin the process and qualify for a visa. Following entry into Canada, you will need to apply for a permanent residency card.

Qualify for immigration. As with all nations, you cannot just "go" to Canada because you desire to. You must have a connection or reason for immigrating. These include marriage to a Canadian citizen, a secured position of work with a Canadian business or employer, sponsorship by a family member who is a Canadian citizen, as a refugee, intention to invest or start a business in Canada, or as a provincial nominee. Once you have a reason or connection for immigration, you proceed with the immigration application process.

Begin the immigration process. The steps will be different for each type of immigration; there is no universal catch-all process for immigration. The process through marriage is different than the process through work or sponsorship. However, all require a temporary visa in order to enter Canada before application for the permanent residency card can be made. Each visa will be different, and you will need to secure the visa application process for your particular visa from either the website of the CIC (Citizenship and Immigration of Canada) or from the Canadian Embassy in Berlin, or from one of the consulate generals in Hamburg, Munich, Stuttgart or Düsseldorf. You will need to attend a visa appointment at one of these consulates with your completed visa application and supplemental documentation (dependent on the type of visa). Remember all forms must be filled out in either English or French.

Enter Canada, and apply for your permanent residency card (IMM 5445). Begin by completing the application form. You can download the application from the CIC website under the left hand column tab "Resources"---Application Forms and Guides.

Gather the supplemental documentation. You will need a photocopy of your passport, certificate of identity or travel that was given to you upon entry into Canada, copy of identity (from Germany), a witnessed and signed statutory declaration of your identity, either a copy of your record of landing, provincial driver's license, or any tax assessment given you by the Canadian Revenue Service, two passport-size photos, and certified translations of any document that was originally in German.

Order the Supplementary Identification Form (IMM 5455). Please note this must be ordered and sent to your address. You can order the packet either by calling the call center (1-888-242-2100) or through the online order form found at the CIC website. It will take approximately two weeks to receive your application packet.

At this time, use the online payment tool to pay your application fee. If you choose to not pay online, you will have to pay at either a Canadian bank or Western Union. To do so you must have the receipt form IMM 5401 with you. This form can only be obtained by ordering it through the online order form at the CIC website (similar to ordering IMM 5444). You must send the receipt along with your application packet.

Compile the forms, documents, IMM 5455 and the receipt (if needed) together and mail to the Case Processing Center in Nova Scotia for review.

Case processing Centre P.O. Box 10020 Sydney, NS B1P 7C1

Wait for approval. You will be notified in writing if your application is denied. If it is approved, your residency card will be sent to your nearest CIC center, and you will be asked to go in person to retrieve it.

About the Author

Mallory Ferland has been writing professionally since her start in 2009 as an editorial assistant for Idaho-based Premier Publishing. Her writing and photography have appeared in "Idaho Cuisine" magazine, "Spokane Sizzle" and various online publications. She graduated from Gonzaga University in 2009 with Bachelor of Arts degrees in history and French language and now writes, photographs and teaches English in Sao Paulo, Brazil.

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