How to Make a Contract

By Laura Hageman
Make a Contract

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Contracts can range from formal to informal. As long as you and the person you are making the agreement with have a "meeting of the minds" and sign a piece of paper that describes what both parties agree on, it is generally considered an official contract. Less formal, oral contracts, may also be enforceable depending upon the circumstances surrounding the formation of the contract.

Place your company name on the top of the contract. The document will usually be set up with two small blocks and one large block below that will consist of information that will make it clear what the two parties agree on.

Write the address and description of the event that is the subject of the contract and the contact information of the person you are servicing, including the email address and phone number in the right block. Write the customer's name and address in the left block.

Write in the block below the two blocks the due date to receive the contract back. In most cases you may be making the agreement face to face so you will not need this part. You will have about two paragraphs that will contain valuable information regarding the agreement.

State the name of the company or your name in the first paragraph and what services will be provided for the agreed amount of money. This is where you will write what your services are and what you will be doing to receive the fees. You will also mention the date of the event, where and what time you will arrive and how long you will stay (if applicable). If there are any extra costs you will add your stipulations in the first paragraph.

State in the second paragraph you will add some more information in order to clarify the contract. You will state the date and time that the event will take place and that the person you are doing a service for is accepting to the proposed pricing structure and services that will be rendered. The customer will sign below and you will need to add on the bottom of the contract your contact information in case the customer has any questions regarding the contract.

About the Author

Laura Hageman has written varied articles on real estate to entertainment topics for the past three years. Hageman wrote a romantic comedy novel entitled Her Desire listed on ebookmall.com. She has written for Web sites such as CurrentForeclosures and Triond over the course of 7 years. Hageman holds a Bachelor's degree in Arts.

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