How to Recycle Hydraulic Hoses

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Have hydraulic hoses that you want to recycle? It may take some digging to find the right place to take them. Hydraulic hoses are typically made from plastic or rubber, depending on the manufacturer and what the hoses were used for. To ensure you are taking them to the right recycling facility, it's best to investigate what kind of materials are in your hoses.

Contact the hose manufacturer to find out what materials the hoses are made of. Information on the hoses' components may be clearly displayed on the manufacturer's website, or you may have to contact them via telephone or email. The company may not tell you the exact composition of the hoses due to patent restrictions, but they may be able to give you a rough idea of what materials the hoses are made from.

Contact your local waste hauler or municipal waste management office to find out if they accept the materials contained in your hoses. Also, ask which days you can recycle these materials curbside. It may turn out that they only accept these materials at their collection centers, or they may not accept the materials at all.

Register your materials at The Recycler's Exchange on Recycle.net to sell or trade your materials. Type in the pertinent information about your hydraulic hoses to send the information out to all companies looking for recycled materials. Many manufacturers use scrap rubber in materials such as playground surfaces, so they're often looking for new sources to purchase those materials from. The good part about the exchange listing is you may make a few dollars from recycling your materials, depending on how much you have.

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About the Author

Nicole Vulcan has been a journalist since 1997, covering parenting and fitness for The Oregonian, careers for CareerAddict, and travel, gardening and fitness for Black Hills Woman and other publications. Vulcan holds a Bachelor of Arts in English and journalism from the University of Minnesota. She's also a lifelong athlete and is pursuing certification as a personal trainer.

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