How to Get an EPO on Someone in Kentucky

By Kelly Kaczmarek
EPOs, further abuse, the victim

Thinkstock/Comstock/Getty Images

Lawmakers in Kentucky realize that domestic violence is a very serious situation, and the victims who suffer from this type of criminal behavior need all the help they can get. For this reason, the state of Kentucky has made it fairly easy for a victim of domestic violence to obtain an emergency protective order (EPO) against her abuser. The EPO is a very useful tool for victims of domestic violence because the EPO provides a form of protection for the victim in a situation where the victim may otherwise feel helpless in fighting the actions of the abuser.

Filing your petition is your first step towards removing the abuser from your life.

Stockbyte/Stockbyte/Getty Images

File a petition for an EPO with the clerk of court in your county of residence or in the county to which you fled to escape domestic violence. Describe the most recent acts of violence or threatening behavior you have experienced at the hands of the abuser in your report. Include information about any instances in which the abuser threatened you or your family with a weapon or other dangerous instrument.

Law enforcement helps victims of domestic violence all throughout the protection process.

Digital Vision./Photodisc/Getty Images

Ask a law enforcement official to serve the EPO on the defendant of your domestic violence case. Wait for the law enforcement official or the agency who was assigned to serve the EPO to contact you and inform you of when the EPO was delivered to the abuser. Call the delivery agency after a few days to determine if and when the EPO was served if the company fails to contact you first about the EPO's delivery status.

You only have one chance in court to prove the abuse occurred.

Comstock/Comstock/Getty Images

Attend your court hearing on the scheduled date. Describe the abuse and threats you have endured from the defendant to the judge. Provide any physical evidence, such as photographs of the abuse or official medical and police reports, to prove to the judge the abuse occurred. Tell the judge what type of protection you are seeking or what safety needs you feel must be met in order to protect yourself and your family from the abuser. Wait for the judge to rule on your domestic violence case.

About the Author

Kelly Kaczmarek began writing when her first published work was presented at her alma mater's Women's Studies Research Symposium. Her articles now appear on various websites. After studying abroad in Europe and Japan, Kaczmarek earned a Bachelor of Arts in international studies from Bowling Green State University.

Cite this Article A tool to create a citation to reference this article Cite this Article