Should I List My Address on My Checks?

By Vera Leigh

Today, you can easily acquire someone's private information illegally. Protect your identity by taking some time to think about the information you make widely available to strangers. Some examples include putting your phone number in a public phone book, posting your email on Facebook or other social media sites and printing your address on your personal checks.

Uses

Evaluate your personal check uses. Before debit cards, personal checks came the closest to paying with cash at a business without having actual cash. Today, personal check purchases are declining in some industries. For example, the Los Angeles Times reports that Fresh & Easy Neighborhood Market grocery stores in California do not accept personal checks anymore, and Whole Foods Market is considering doing the same. While many other businesses continue to accept personal checks, the Los Angeles Times report brings up an interesting notion. In the future, how much will we need personal checks? Ask yourself: How much do I use personal checks?

Purchasing Procedures

Purchase goods with a debit card. Considering the limited ways many people use personal checks today--monthly rent payments to private landlords, for example--using your debit card is easier. The Los Angeles Times quoted Bill Jordan, Whole Foods' regional vice president, saying: "Since most of our customers pay with cash, debit cards or credit cards, we want them to be able to check out as quickly as possible."

If it turns out that you need to give someone a personal check, then consider ordering them without a preprinted home address. This may decrease the chances of a stranger finding out where you live if you lose your checkbook or someone steals it.

Considerations

Be patient. When you use a personal check at a business and you don't have a preprinted address, an employee may ask you to write your address and phone number on the check. Writing that information does not take long and is a small request for the big savings you could accrue by protecting your home from a break-in.

About the Author

Vera Leigh has worked as a professional freelance writer since 2008. Her work has appeared in "Learn Overseas" and "Grad Source" magazines. In addition, she received an honorable mention in "Newsweek's" My Turn contest. She has written features for nonprofits focused on literacy, education, genomics and health. In her spare time, Leigh puts her English major to use by tutoring in grammar and composition.