How to Obtain Adoption Records in Oklahoma

By Deb Cohen - Updated April 12, 2017
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Oklahoma adoption records can be obtained through the Adoption Reunion Registry of the Oklahoma Department of Human Services. Groups that can access adoption records include adult adoptees, adoptive guardians of children under the age of 18, birth parents, and other individuals meeting the criteria established by the state. However, records are not released without the consent of both parties.

Join the Oklahoma Mutual Consent Voluntary Registry

Adopted adults age 18 or older, the legal guardians of an adoptee under 18, the adult descendants of a deceased adopted adult, birth parents and adult biological relatives of an adopted adult can all apply to join the voluntary registry. Apply by calling (405) 521-3832 and requesting a copy of the Oklahoma Mutual Consent Voluntary Registry form. Complete the form and have it notarized by a clerk of the court, judge or notary public. You'll need to include in the application a photocopy of your current driver's license, a photocopy of your social security card or birth certificate, and a $20 registration fee in the form of a check payable to the Oklahoma Department of Human Services Reunion Registry. Mail the application to:

Voluntary Adoption Reunion Registry Oklahoma Department of Human Services P.O. Box 25352 Oklahoma City, OK 73125 (405) 521-4373

Initiate a Search

You'll need to wait six months after registering for the Mutual Consent Voluntary Registry before you initiate a search. This waiting period is mandatory. After the wait period, request the documents for an initiation of a search by contacting the Children and Family Services Division: Confidential Intermediary Search Program at (405) 521-3832. Complete and send in the necessary documentation. Include a nonrefundable payment of $400 for a first search and $200 for each subsequent search. Be aware that if the subject of the adoption search does not want to be found, the state will not disclose their identity. The search fees are nonrefundable, even when the search is unsuccessful.

About the Author

Deb Cohen has been a writer since 1995 when she was only ten years old. Cohen has written for several blogs. She wrote for the McGill University newspaper where she graduated with honors with a degree in political science.

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