How to Get a Copy of a Quit-Claim Deed

By George Lawrence J.D.
Search for deeds at the county property records office.

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Quitclaim deeds are often used between spouses going through a divorce or used to transfer title in land from a decedent to his heirs. The deed contains no protections or guarantees about the land; it simply transfers whatever title the grantor had to the grantee. According to the "Washington Post," land owners technically do not need a copy of the deed provided the deed was filed in the county land records office where the land is located. Nonetheless, the county records office can provide copies of the deed for a small cost.

Visit the land records office located in the county where the land is situated. The office is typically located in the clerk’s building or the local courthouse building; an office is in every county.

Ask the clerk that you need to find a quitclaim deed. You can search quitclaim deeds according to the last name of either the grantor (the person who gave title away) or the grantee (the person with title). If you currently have title, for example, you could search the grantee-index according to your last name.

Locate the deed in the index. Verify that it is the deed you are looking for by checking various information, including the land description and the names on the deed.

Ask the clerk to make a copy of the deed for you. Fees are typically associated with this but they tend to be small (less than $1 per page as of 2010).

About the Author

Based in Traverse City, Mich., George Lawrence has been writing professionally since 2009. His work primarily appears on various websites. An avid outdoorsman, Lawrence holds Bachelor of Arts degrees in both criminal justice and English from Michigan State University, as well as a Juris Doctor from the Thomas M. Cooley Law School, where he graduated with honors.

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