How to Change a Name After Marriage in Pennsylvania

By Shauna Cuff - Updated December 17, 2018
Feet of bride and groom, wedding shoes

Changing your last name after marriage in Pennsylvania does not require a visit to the court house or a lawyer. The change can be done with proper documentation, a visit to your local Department of Motor Vehicles and Social Security office, and completed necessary forms obtained at those offices.

Tip

If you change your name after getting married and you live in Pennsylvania, you'll need to change your driver's license, vehicle registration and Social Security card. Visit the Social Security office prior to the Department of Motor Vehicles, as having an updated Social Security card expedites the process at the DMV.

Changing Your Social Security Card in Person

To get a new Social Security card with your married name, take your original official marriage certificate and a proof of identity document to your local Social Security office. The proof of identity document must show your previous name (expired documents are acceptable as long as they show your old name). The identity document must also contain identifying information or a recent photograph. Examples of a proof of identity document include a Pennsylvania Driver's License, a Pennsylvania state ID card or a passport. If these cannot be obtained within 10 days, a health insurance card (Medicare cards are not accepted), School ID card or Military ID card can be used as a replacement.

You can find your local Social Security Office on their official website. Go to the nearest office and request Form SS-5. This form can be printed online prior to arrival at the office. If the form has not previously been printed, you can fill it out now. You can find your local social security office on the official Social Security Administration website. Show the clerk your identifying documents, as well as your marriage certificate, and you'll receive your new Social Security card (there may be a waiting period while the clerk prepares your card).

Changing Your Social Security Card by Mail

To get a new Social Security card by mail, print Form SS-5 from the Social Security Administration website and fill the form out in its entirety using only blue or black ink. Collect your marriage certificate and identifying documents. The identifying documents have the same requirements in person or by mail, and they must be originals. Mail the marriage certificate, identifying documents and Form SS-5 to any Social Security office. You'll receive your new Social Security card in the mail along with your returned documents.

Changing your Driver's Licenses or State ID

After you get your new Social Security card, you can go get your new driver's license or state ID card. Take your new Social Security card, original marriage certificate and current driver's license or state ID to your local Department of Motor Vehicles Driver License Center. You can find your local DMV at the government's website. Present the identifying documentation, marriage certificate and check for $29.50 made out to PennDOT to the clerk. Sign the bottom of the form they present to you after reviewing your documentation, then wait in line to have your photograph taken for your new driver's license or state ID.

Changing Vehicle Registration and Title

To change the name on your vehicle registration, print Form MV-41a from the Pennsylvania Department of Motor Vehicles website. If you cannot print the form, go to your local DMV and request the form. Fill out side A of the form to request an updated vehicle or trailer registration card. Fill out side B if you are also requesting an updated title. If you need a new title, you'll have to pay a $53.00 fee. You'll receive your new registration card at the center, but you'll need to wait for the new title to come in the mail.

About the Author

Shauna Cuff began writing music reviews for vteens.org in 2001. She wrote technical guides for the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania, and her poetry appeared in Harrisburg Area Community College's "Voices." Cuff currently writes articles that focus on health and parenting. She studied art and English at Pennsylvania College of Art and Design.

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