How to Change Probation Locations

By Mike Broemmel

If you are serving a term of probation, you might be interested in relocating. Perhaps you were offered a new job in another state and you might wonder how to change probation locations. Although the laws and regulations vary slightly from jurisdiction to jurisdiction, the procedure to change probation locations essentially is the same across the United States.

Apply with your current probation officer to seek a probation location in another jurisdiction. Your probation officer will have a standard form to use for this application. Include within the application will be the city and state where you desire to relocate and the specific reason for the move.

Assist your probation officer as necessary in gaining approval from the appropriate probation office where you desire to move. The probation officer in this jurisdiction needs to approve your relocation. If you are in an unsupervised location, there will be little to no problem obtaining approval from the new jurisdiction for your relocation. If you are serving some sort of supervised term of probation, the office at the proposed relocation site will consider the crime for which you are convicted and the specific requirements of your probation in considering whether to accept you.

Obtain a copy of the order approving your probation relocation. Your probation officer will provide you this paperwork. You need to keep this document in your possession while moving from one location to the next.

Report to the appropriate probation office in the jurisdiction of your relocation. Normally you need to present yourself to this probation office within 72 hours of your arrival in the new location. Make sure you confirm this time frame before your actual move because time requirements do vary from jurisdiction to jurisdiction.

About the Author

Mike Broemmel began writing in 1982. He is an author/lecturer with two novels on the market internationally, "The Shadow Cast" and "The Miller Moth." Broemmel served on the staff of the White House Office of Media Relations. He holds a Bachelor of Arts in journalism and political science from Benedictine College and a Juris Doctorate from Washburn University. He also attended Brunel University, London.

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