What Is Theft in the 3rd Degree?

By Ray Byrnes
What Is Theft in the 3rd Degree?

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The classification and punishment of third degree theft varies by state. Generally, this is the least severe type of theft and is classified as a misdemeanor.

Classification

Third degree theft is classified as a misdemeanor.

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Third degree theft is classified as a misdemeanor, meaning someone convicted of the crime cannot be indicted. The type of misdemeanor, however, varies by state. In Alaska and Alabama, for instance, third degree theft counts as a Class A misdemeanor, while in Oregon it qualifies as a Class C misdemeanor.

Value

The value of a theft and its classification varies by state.

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This value of the theft and its classification also varies by state. In Alabama, a Class C misdemeanor indicates the value of the stolen property is less than $500. This holds true in Alaska, but to qualify for third degree theft in that state, the value of the stolen property must be at least $50. And in Oregon, any theft of less than $100 qualifies as third degree theft.

Punishment

The punishment for misdemeanors is determined by the state.

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The punishment for misdemeanors is determined by the state. In Alabama, after being convicted of third degree theft by a judge, a person will be fined up to $6,000 and receive up to one year in prison. In Alaska, Class A misdemeanors generally result in a fine up to $10,000, and in Oregon, a third degree theft charge will carry a maximum jail term of 30 days, and a maximum fine of $1,250.

About the Author

Ray Byrnes began writing for publication in 2004. His work has been featured in "Buzz Magazine," online at the217 and in several literary journals. He specializes in writing fiction, poetry and journalism. He received his Bachelor of Arts in rhetoric from the University of Illinois.