How OSHA Regulations Affect the Hotel Business

By Dylan Kasprzyk
OSHA regulations protect the health and safety of hotel employees.
hotel image by Lars Christensen from Fotolia.com

The Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA), which operates under the U.S. Department of Labor, regulates and oversees private and public workplace safety and health. Hotels work falls under the umbrella of OSHA-regulated industries.

History

Congress created OSHA under the Occupational Safety and Health Act of 1970. Penalties for violating OSHA regulations include imprisonment terms of "six months or less but more than thirty days." Regulations that apply to the hotel industry cover such areas as sanitation and communication with workers about hazards.

Function

Hotels must meet or exceed OSHA standards in many areas including employee work facilities, sanitation and protection from hazardous materials. These standards help protect hotel customers as well, but OSHA primarily protects the safety and health of workers.

Hazard Protection

OSHA requires employers to inform hotel employees about any hazardous chemicals they may come in contact with on the job, such as potentially toxic cleaning supplies, and train them to safely handle such substances. Employers must also train hotel workers in how to use laundry facilities or other dangerous equipment, and provide protective gear for employees who encounter hazardous fluids, such as gloves for workers who clean toilets.

Sanitation

OSHA regulates workplace environments, including environments for hotel workers. It requires employers to keep hotels as clean as possible, provide waste disposal, vermin control, clean drinking water for employees, waste receptacles and toilet facilities for its employees.

About the Author

Dylan Kasprzyk has been copywriting for six major national radio stations since 2008. His work requires extensive marketing research. Excerpts of his writing are published in "Vegan Bodybuilding & Fitness," as well as on the websites for 1051 the Buzz and Portland Metroscope. He holds a Bachelor of Science in communications from Portland State University.