How to Prepare a Grant Deed

By Brett Johnson
legal pad and mechanical pencil image by alpy7 from Fotolia.com

A grant deed is a security instrument used to transfer complete ownership of real estate property. Grant deeds are used by lenders and title companies in real estate transactions. It’s important that a grant deed is prepared correctly and in its entirety to ensure enforcement and validity.

Obtain a blank grant deed from a business stationary store or from a reputable online source.

Complete the contact mailing address information located in the upper left corner of the document. This will be where you request to have the document sent to you after it has been recorded. The next section title “space above this line for recorder’s use only” should be left blank.

Get the assessor’s parcel number and legal description for the property. This necessary information can be obtained from the county recorder’s office. Your parcel number also can be found on your preliminary title report or property tax statement. It must be typed exactly as it reads. Example assessor’s parcel number: 252-040-3.

Check the appropriate box that will determine how the transfer will be taxed. The taxes can be computed on the full value of property conveyed, full value less the liens remaining at the time of transfer, or based on being in an unincorporated area. It’s important to understand these options and it’s suggested that you seek legal advice or request more information from the county recorder’s office.

Complete the grantor section that begins with “For valuable consideration.” Fill in the information of the grantor, continued by the information below it for the grantee. Next, fill the city and county of the property followed by the complete legal description.

Example Property Legal Description: A PARCEL OF LAND LOCATED IN THE STATE OF CA, COUNTY OF SAN JOAQUIN, WITH ADDRESS OF 905 PARDEE LANE, STOCKTON CA 95376-3531 HAVING A TAX ASSESSOR NUMBER OF 252-040-3 AND BEING THE SAME PROPERTY MORE FULLY DESCRIBED AS LOT #10 TRACT # 8076 AND DESCRIBED IN DOCUMENT NUMBER 1408134 DATED 06/16/2003 AND RECORDED 07/11/2003.

Do not date or sign the grant deed at this time. The grant deed must be signed in the presence of a notary public, and then recorded to be a valid and enforceable deed.

About the Author

Brett Johnson began writing professionally in 2006. His work includes "The Buyer's Guide to Home Ownership" and training manuals for mortgage banking institutions. Johnson holds an Associate of Arts in business administration from Merritt College-Oakland.