How to Find an EIN Number for an Existing Corporation

By Edward Cox
The EIN numbers for the largest companies may be easy to track down while smaller companies may require more looking.
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If a company is required to file a tax return, it should have an EIN number. Business entities with EIN numbers include sole proprietors, partnerships, corporations, nonprofit organizations, government bodies, houses of worship, and even trusts and estates. Finding an EIN number is not difficult, but it may take a little research. Fortunately, there are several forms that a company must file using its EIN number, and this creates plenty of opportunities to track down that company's EIN.

Contact the company. Sometimes the most effective way to get an answer is also the most direct way. You can try simply calling or writing the company and asking for its EIN number.

Check the company's website. Some companies will include their EIN number there.

Look at any documents that you've received from the company. An EIN number might appear on papers such as an invoice or pay stub. If you've received a W-2 tax form from the company, that should have the EIN number on it.

Check the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC) for documents filed by the company. All filings required by the SEC should contain the company's EIN number. The Department of Labor suggests using the SEC's EDGAR search tool to locate SEC filings.

Check the company's Form 990. This form, required of all nonprofit organizations, may be found using the Guidestar system. Guidestar, a nonprofit organization itself, has created a database of other nonprofits. The Guidestar system merely requires you to create a user name and password to log in.

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About the Author

Edward Cox began writing and editing legal articles in 2007. He served as a note editor and author on work published in the "Journal of Agricultural Law." Cox writes about legal issues as a Drake Agricultural Law Center fellow. He holds a Juris Doctorate from Drake University Law School.